Industrial and Commercial Establishments Regulation

Occupational Health and Safety Act
INDUSTRIAL AND COMMERCIAL ESTABLISHMENTS REGULATION
R.R.Q. 1981, c. S-2.1, r. 9
(as am. by O.C. 1960-86, 1961-86; 55-90; 374-97; and 885-2001)


Division I — Definitions


1.1. Unless the context otherwise indicates or unless otherwise mentioned, the following words or expressions have the meaning hereinafter given to them:
(1) “CSA”: Canadian Standards Association;
(2) “hoisting apparatus”: includes cranes, travelling cranes, gantries, winches, blocks and other similar apparatus but does not include elevators and dumb-waiters;
(3) “suitable”: in accordance with the appraisal of the Inspection Service;
(4) “approved”: accepted by the Inspection Service or by any agency designated by the Government;
(5) “camps”: temporary or permanent buildings and their dependences, organized by the employer to accommodate the workers engaged in forestry operations, mining, railroad, road and dam work and other similar works, in saw mills, in pulp and paper mills, whether they are permanent, temporary or summer camps;
(6) “fire load”: the average mass of combustible materials per square metre, from which the potential heat liberation may be calculated based on the calorific value of the materials and includes the furnishings, finished floor, wall ceiling finishes, trim, and temporary and movable partitions;
(7) “combustible construction”: construction that does not meet the requirements for non-combustible construction;
(8) “non-combustible construction”: construction in which a degree of fire safety is attained by the use of non-combustible materials for structural members and other building assembles;
(9) “harmful effect”: any bodily injury, disease, or impairment, except where such a condition is transitory, infrequent, of short duration, not cumulative, and does not endanger the persons so affected;
(10) “establishment”: the industrial and commercial establishment defined by the Act;
(11) “industrial and commercial establishment occupancy, high hazard”: the occupancy of a building or part of it containing sufficient quantities of highly combustible and flammable or explosive materials which, because of their inherent characteristics, constitute a special fire hazard (see Schedule 1);
(12) “industrial and commercial establishment occupancy, low hazard”: the occupancy of a building in which the combustible content is not more than 50 kilograms or 1 200 megajoules per square metre of floor area (see Schedule 1);
(13) “industrial and commercial establishment occupancy, medium hazard”: the occupancy of a building or part of it containing more than 50 kilograms or 1 200 megajoules per square metre of floor, and not classified as high hazard industrial occupancy (see Schedule 1);
(14) “service stair”: stair leading to machinery or boiler rooms, or stair servicing any machinery platform. Such stair cannot be used as exit;
(15) “harmful exposure”: exposure to dusts, fumes, mists, vapours or gases of such duration and of such concentration as to produce effects herein defined as harmful. Concentrations which are considered to be the maximum acceptable limits for various substances are listed in the report entitled, Threshold Limit Values of Airborne Contaminants, and published by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH);
(16) “inspector”: the inspector appointed under the Industrial and Commercial Establishments Act;
(17) “installation”: any group of apparatus, or electrical, technical, mechanical, sanitary, frigorific or safety devices or elements including, notably: a conveyor installation, a lightning rod installation;
(18) “flammable liquid”: a liquid having flash point below 60° Celsius and a vapour pressure not exceeding 275 kilopascals at 38° Celsius;
(19) “non-combustible material”: material which conforms to the CSA standard B.54.1 or to the ASTM standard E 136-1965;
(20) “motor”: includes steam and gas engine or turbine internal combustion and compressed air engines, electrical motors, turbines and hydraulic wheels and wind-engines;
(21) “NFPA”: National Fire Protection Association;
(22) “flash point”: the minimum temperature at which a liquid emits sufficient vapour to form a mixture capable of being ignited near the surface of the liquid when in contact with air;
(23) “punch press”: a machine operated by hand or foot or activated by air or oil motor and equipped with slide-blocks or plunger-pistons with punchs used to assemble, compress, form, cut, punch or stamp metals, plastics or other materials excluding machines for hot forging;
(24) “professional risk”: risk of corporal injury caused by an accident or a disease occurring to a worker due to the nature of his work or while working;
(25) “inspection service”: the body of officers appointed by the Quebec government to enforce this regulation under the authority of the Director (chief inspector) and his representatives;
(26) “corrosive substance”: a substance that when in contact with animal tissue, produces by chemical reaction more or less severe destruction whose effects to the system are either of a secondary nature or less pronounced than those caused by poisons;
(27) “hazardous substance”: a substance because of its explosive, flammable, poisonous, corrosive, oxidizing, irritant or otherwise harmful nature is likely to cause injury;
(28) “irritant substance”: a substance that when in contact with animal tissue, causes more or less severe inflammation not leading to destruction of tissues or effects on the system;
(29) “harmful substance”: when applied to dust, fumes, mists, vapours or gases, means a generator of injury or impairment of the normal functions of any part of the body, except where such a condition is transitory, infrequent, or of a short duration, not cumulative and does not endanger the persons exposed to these substances;
(30) “oxidizing substance”: a substance which, while not combustible itself, can provide sufficient oxygen to support the combustion of combustible materials in the absence of air; these substances include nitrates, chlorates, perchlorates, peroxides, permanganates, oxygen;
(31) “spontaneously combustible substance”: a substance which, when exposed to air, oxidizes slowly and may be ignited by autogenously developed heat without the application of an external source of ignition;
(32) “poisonous substance”: a substance which, when taken in low concentrations by mouth, or inhaled, or absorbed through the skin, rapidly jeopardizes health or life by other than mechanical or physical action;
(33) “self-propelling vehicle”: a motor vehicle mounted on wheels, on caterpillars or on rails, used for the transportation of objects or materials, or for towing or pushing trollies, carriages or materials;
(34) “adequate ventilation”: ventilation that under normal operating conditions is sufficient to keep the concentration of gases, vapours, fumes, or dust concentrations below the amount which will produce harmful effects or below 25% of the low explosive limit, whichever is lower;
(35) “working zone”: floor space required by the worker to perform his work freely.


Division II — General Provisions


2.1 Object


2.1.1. The industrial and commercial establishments with all movable and immovables belonging to them shall be so arranged and maintained as to protect workers against professional risks. They shall be so constructed and maintained as to offer clean and sanitary conditions necessary for the health of employees.


2.2 Duties of the head of establishment


2.2.1. Any head of establishment shall:
(a) Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)
(b) ensure that the means of egress, the fire alarm and fire fighting systems and any other apparatus, system or installation, related to an industrial or commercial establishment, are in accordance with this regulation;
(c)-(g) Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


2.2.2. Any head of establishment shall inform his workers about this regulation and shall ensure that every worker:
(a) correctly uses any safety device or protective apparatus at his disposal;
(b) Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)
(c) Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)
(d) is informed of the inherent risks in his work and does not perform any work he judges hazardous for his safety; and
(e) knows any operation ensuring the good running order of apparatus and machines under his responsibility and is informed of the emergency measures to observe in case of fire, explosion or other disaster.


2.3 Scope


2.3.1. This regulation applies to any new establishment, to any modification, and to any change of occupancy of an existing establishment. It also applies to any new installation and equipment in an existing establishment. However, sections 3.2.1, 3.2.4, 5.2.2 and 5.2.3 and Division IV apply only to establishments built before December 1, 1976 or whose construction began before the said date.


2.3.2. For the existing buildings and equipments, on the enforcement of this regulation, appropriate measures shall be taken to ensure safety and welfare conditions equivalent to that contemplated in this regulation.


2.3.3. In the application of this regulation, the nature, the dimension and the arrangement of materials may differ from the present regulation as long as the strength of the material and its safe use are at least equivalent to that prescribed.


2.3.4. Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


2.4 Plan Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


2.5 Notice of defect Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


2.6 Power of the inspectors Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


Division III — Area Conditions Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


Division IV — Means of Egress and Fire Protection


4.1 Means of egress


4.1.1. In buildings used as offices, camps, warehouses or for commercial or industrial purposes, the means of egress shall be in accordance with the requirements of Title III of the General Regulations Respecting Safety in Public Buildings (O.C. 315 of January 20, 1971 and am.).


4.2 Protection of vertical openings


4.2.1. Any stair, elevator, ventilation or light shaft or other opening between floors, shall be so enclosed as to prevent the spreading of flames or smoke, except for openings specified in sections 4.2.2, 4.2.3 and 4.2.4.


4.2.2. In any low hazard establishment, or medium hazard establishment protected with automatic extinguishers, non-enclosed vertical openings are allowed, provided that:
(a) these openings do not connect more than 3 communicating floors;
(b) the lowest level or the one above is at ground level;
(c) the 3 communicating floors are unobstructed so that the beginning of a fire can be easily detected;
(d) the capacity of exits can accommodate the occupant load of the 3 storeys;
(e) each storey considered separately, has at least one-half of its required exits leading directly to an area isolated with a partition having a fire resistance of 2 hours;
(f) any other requirement of division IV is observed.


4.2.3. In any existing building only, in areas protected by automatic extinguishers, the vertical openings can be unprotected if none are used as a part of a means of egress and if the required exits are smoke-proof towers, exterior stairs or horizontal protected exits.


4.2.5. The walls of the enclosed vertical openings shall have a fire resistance rating as follows:
(a) 2 hours for new buildings of 4 storeys or more, or for any high hazard establishment;
(b) 1 hour for other new buildings; and
(c) 3/4 of an hour for other existing buildings.


4.3 Automatic extinguishers


4.3.1. An automatic extinguishing system shall be:
(a) designed, constructed, installed and tested in accordance with the standards: Standard for the installation of sprinkler systems NFPA 13-1969, Standard for foam extinguishing systems NFPA 11-1970, Standard on carbon dioxide extinguishing systems NFPA 12-1968, Standard for water spray fixed systems for fire protection NFPA 15-1969 or Standard for dry chemical extinguishing systems NFPA 17-1969;
(b) installed in any room involving high fire or explosion hazards, or in any high hazard building of combustible construction.


4.3.2. Section 4.3.1 applies to any new high hazard building or to any existing building which undergoes a change of occupancy.


4.3.3. An automatic extinguishing system activating the alarm system is acceptable to replace the fire detection systems.


4.4 Standpipe and hose system


4.4.1. Standpipe and hose system shall be installed in the following buildings:
(a) buildings of more than 3 storeys or more than 14 metres above ground level;
(b) buildings of more than 3 storeys without automatic extinguishers and having an area of more than 1 000 square metres;
(c) buildings of 2 storeys without automatic fire extinguishers and having an area of more than 2000 square metres if the hazards are low, of more than 1 500 square metres if the hazards are medium, and of more than 1 000 square metres if the hazards are high;
(d) buildings of one storey without automatic extinguishers and having more than 3 000 square metres if the hazards are low, more than 2000 square metres if the fire hazards are medium, and of more than 1 000 square metres if the hazards are high.


4.4.2. Any standpipe and hose system shall be:
(a) so calculated as to meet the flow and pressure requirements of the Fire Department;
(b) provided with connections for the Fire Department, located on the street side and clearly indicated so as to permit easy and fast attachment;
(c) distributed in hose stations which are:
(i) easily accessible;
(ii) located so that any part of the building is within 6 metres from the nozzle when the hose is extended;
(iii) installed in a hose cabinet containing the hose and its rack, the necessary connections from the fourth storey, a hose valve, and an approved extinguisher. The hose shall be connected and ready for use at any time;
(d) inspected at least annually.


4.5 Portable fire extinguishers Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


4.6 Fire alarm and detection systems


4.6.1. The fire alarm systems shall be used exclusively in case of fire or other disaster.


4.6.2. Fire alarm systems shall be installed:
(a) in any new building of mercantile occupancy having more than 2 storeys and where the occupant load exceeds 300 persons, or exceeds 150 persons below or above the first storey;
(b) in any new industrial or commercial establishment of high or medium fire hazard having more than 2 storeys and where the occupant load exceeds 300 persons, or exceeds 20 persons below or above the first storey;
(c) in any new industrial or commercial establishment of low fire hazard where the occupant load exceeds 500 persons or exceeds 75 persons below or above the first storey.


4.6.3. One or more announciators shall be installed in strategic locations for fire alarm systems, in all buildings of 4 storeys or more in height, or in any building where there are more than 12 manually operated fire alarm boxes.


4.6.4. The fire alarm gongs shall be heard above the normal noise level and shall be located so that there is at least:
(a) one 100 millimetre diameter gong for each 100 square metres of floor area;
(b) one 150 millimetre diameter gong for each 550 square metres of floor area; or
(c) one 250 millimetre diameter gong for each 1200 square metres of floor area.


4.6.5.
In any building not provided with an automatic fire alarm or an extinguishing system, a manual fire alarm system shall be provided:
(a) where the occupant load exceeds 100 persons; or
(b) where more than 25 persons are employed below and above the first storey.
This requirement does not apply to one-storey buildings where the entire area is not subdivided and where all parts are visible by the occupants.


4.6.6. The manual fire alarm boxes forming part of an electrical fire alarm system shall be so installed that:
(a) from any part of a floor area, it is not necessary to travel more than 60 metres to reach a manual fire alarm box on the same floor; and
(b) a manual fire alarm box is located within 7,5 metres from any exit of the floor area.


4.6.7. In any building where a fire alarm system is required, approved fire detectors shall be installed in all parts of the building used as, furnace and incinerator rooms, elevator shafts, and any place where hazardous substances are used or stored.


4.6.8. The heat detectors shall be installed on the ceiling, or on the walls within 300 millimetres from the ceiling and at distances not exceeding the maximum spacing for which they were designed.


4.6.9. Smoke detection systems shall be installed in any industrial and commercial establishment having more than 4 storeys and equipped with an air circulating system.


4.6.10. The smoke detectors shall be installed in the main air return or exhaust ducts or in the common duct upstream of the damper located nearest the fan.


4.6.11. The smoke detectors shall:
(a) be easily accessible for maintenance;
(b) stop all the fans except those which directly evacuate the air outside; and
(c) activate the alarm system in all areas of the building.


Division V — Environmental Conditions


5.1 Ventilation Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


5.2 Lighting


5.2.1. Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


5.2.2. In case of failure of the power required for the lighting of exits during occupancy of the establishment, an emergency lighting system shall:
(a) be provided for the lighting of exits, and the notices indicating exits, passageways, corridors and alleys leading directly to exits;
(b) maintain in areas required in paragraph (a) a level of illumination of 50 lux for a period of at least half an hour at floor level; and
(c) be inspected monthly.


5.2.3. Emergency lighting shall be ensured by generators or accumulators of the recharging type that shall go into operation and continue to maintain current in case of power failure.


5.3 Noises and vibrations Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


Division VI — Precautions against Machinery Hazards Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


Division VII — Hand Tools and Portable Power-Driven Tools Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


Division VIII — Handling and Transport of Material Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


Division IX — Maintenance and Repair Works and Hazardous Works Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


Division X — Control of Hazardous Substances and Hazardous Radiations Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


Division XI — Hygiene and Welfare Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


Division XII — Personal Protective Equipment Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


Division XIII — Transportation of Workers Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


Division XIV — Accident Reports, Medical Examinations and Safety Committees


14.1 Accident report


14.1.1. The head of establishment shall within 48 hours following an accident, prepare a written report for the Inspection Service on any accident causing death of a worker, the impossibility of one person to perform his work during 7 working days or more, or of more than one person during 24 hours or more, or involving material damages of $15,000 or more.


14.1.2. Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


14.2 Medical examinations Repealed. (O.C. 885-2001, s. 378)


14.3 Safety committees


14.3.1. A safety committee shall be established by the head of an industrial establishment in work areas having a work force totalling more than 20 workers and a frequency of more than 25 accidents per million working hours.


14.3.2. The safety committee shall be composed of an equal number of representatives for the workers and for the employer; the minimum number shall be 2 for each party. Where an accredited association exists, the same will choose the workers’ representatives.


14.3.3. The safety committee shall:
(a) ensure the observance of this regulation and any other safety rules of the establishment;
(b) analyze the causes and make reports concerning any accident to the head of the establishment;
(c) hold a meeting at least twice a month for discussion respecting current accidents, their causes, and the means to prevent them; and
(d) prepare complete reports of the minutes of meetings.


Division XV — Women Working Nights


15.1 Authorization of work


15.1.1. Pursuant to section 18a of the Act (R.S.Q., 1964, ch. 150 am. by S.Q., 1968, ch. 46), the permit authorizing women to work at night may be granted only if the following conditions are met:
(a) the head of the enterprise shall file his application on special forms drawn up by the Department of Labour and Manpower and shall supply all details required thereon (see appendix 7 and 8);
(b) during the entire work period set by the permit, at least one female supervisor, nurse or first-aid attendant shall be present to see to the health and welfare of the female staff and perform all other pertinent duties;
(c) besides the female supervisor, the female workers’ night shift shall be made up of at least 2 women per workroom or workshop;
(d) the permit is valid only for the period for which it is delivered; in no case shall its validity go beyond one year:
(e) such permit may be revoked without notice if there is breach of any of the delivery conditions;
(f) such permit shall be posted in a conspicuous place at the employees’ main entrance; and
(g) the permit shall list the employer’s name and address, the establishment’s name and address, the number of female employees, the hours of work authorized by the permit, permit delivery conditions, the period during which the permit is valid, the date of delivery and the minister’s signature.


Appendix 1


Classification of buildings or parts of buildings according to their main occupancy


1.Industrial or commercial establishment of high fire hazard. (Establishments Classified Group F, Division 1, in the National Building Code)
Bulk plants for flammable liquids
Bulk storage warehouse for hazardous substances
Cereal mills
Chemical manufacturing or processing plants
Distilleries
Dry cleaning plants
Feed mills
Flour mills
Grain elevators
Lacquer factories
Mattress factories
Paint, varnish and pyroxylin product factories
Rubber processing plants
Spray painting operation
Waste paper processing plants


2.Industrial or commercial establishment of medium fire hazard. (Establishments Classified Group F, Division 2, in the National Building Code)
Aircraft hangars
Box factories
Candy plants
Cold storage plants
Dry cleaning plants not using flammable or explosive solvents or cleaners
Electrical substations
Factories
Freight depots
Helicopter landing areas on roofs
Laboratories
Laundries except self-service
Mattress factories
Planing mills
Printing plants
Repair garages
Salesrooms
Service stations
Storage rooms
Television studios not admitting in a viewing audience
Warehouses
Wholesale rooms
Woodworking factories
Workshops


3.Industrial or commercial establishment of low fire hazard. (Establishments Classified Group F, Division 3, in the National Building Code)
Creameries
Factories
Laboratories
Power plants
Salesrooms
Sample display rooms
Storage garages including open air parking garages
Storage rooms
Warehouses
Workshops


Appendix 2


Maximum and minimum air changes for general ventilation

Type of places, buildings or processRequired ventilation in air changes per hour*
MinimumMaximum
Bakeries1060
Boiler and engine rooms460
Dairies530
Iron foundries430
Non-ferrous foundries660
Storage and parking garages320
Repair garages630
Commercial kitchens1060
Chemical laboratories630
Laundries and press shops10120
Locker rooms215
Machine shops320
Private and general offices230
Restaurants and cafeterias430
Retail stores620
Smoking rooms1060
Washrooms and toilets1030
Warehouses16
*General ventilation is required if no local air system exists.



Appendix 4


Hazardous chemical substances

SubstanceHazard
Acetates, organicFlammable liquids.
Cellulose AcetateCombustible solid.
AcetyleneCompressed gas; flammable.
Acetic Acid (glacial)Flammable material; dangerous in contact with sodium peroxide, nitric acid or barium peroxide, flash point 40°C.
Benzoic AcidCombustible solid.
Hydrobromic AcidCorrosive liquid.
Bromic AcidCorrosive liquid.
Hydrocloric AcidCorrosive liquid; fumes are toxic.
Chlorosulphonic AcidCorrosive liquid; reacts with water to liberate hydrogen chloride.
Chromic Acid, crystalsPowerful oxidizing agent; may react explosively with organic substances.
Chromic Acid, solutionCorrosive liquid.
Hydrocyanic AcidPoisonous gas; highly flammable; fumigant.
Hydrofluoric AcidCorrosive liquid; fumes are extremely toxic.
Fluosilicic AcidCorrosive liquid.
Fluosulphonic AcidCorrosive liquid; fumes are toxic.
Formic AcidCorrosive liquid.
Hexafluorophosphoric AcidCorrosive liquid.
Iodic AcidCorrosive liquid and oxidizing agent.
Acids, mineral (concentrated)Corrosive liquids; some may evolve toxic fumes.
Monofluorophosphoric AcidCorrosive liquid.
Nitric AcidPowerful oxidizing agent and highly corrosive fuming liquid; fumes are highly toxic; may cause fires and explosions upon contact with readily oxidizable materials.
Nitrosyl Sulphuric AcidCorrosive liquid.
Oleic AcidFlammable material susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Acids, organicCombustible liquids or solids.
Peracetic AcidPowerful oxidizing agent.
Perchloric AcidCorrosive liquid; concentrated solutions are dangerously explosive if allowed to come in contact with oxidizable materials.
Perchromic AcidPowerful oxidizing agent.
Phenolsulphonic AcidVery corrosive liquid; fumes are toxic.
Phosphoric AcidCorrosive liquid; fumes are toxic.
Picric AcidExplosive.
Salicylic AcidCombustible solid; dust forms explosive mixtures with air.
Hydrogen SulphideCompressed gas; highly flammable and toxic.
Sulphuric AcidVery corrosive liquid; powerful oxidizing agent; fumes are toxic.
AcrylonitrileFlammable liquid; fumes are toxic. See Nitriles.
Compressed AirCompressed gas; supports combustion.
Alkali metalsFlammable materials; react explosively with water; must be stored under a hydrocarbon liquid.
AlcoholsFlammable liquids.
AldehydesFlammable liquids or combustible solids.
Allyl compoundsFumes are generally toxic.
Matches, strike-anywhereFlammable material.
Aluminum PowderFlammable material; forms flammable and explosive mixtures with air.
Sodium AmalgamFlammable material; may evolve hydrogen on contact with water. See Mercury Compounds.
Lithium AmideFlammable material; decomposes on contact with water.
Sodium AmideFlammable material; very unstable; decomposes on contact with moisture.
AminesFlammable liquids.
Ammonia, anhydrousCompressed gas; flammable and very irritating.
Ammonium HydroxideCorrosive liquid.
AnhydridesFlammable materials; some may react violently with water.
Acetic AnhydrideFlammable material and corrosive liquid; quite reactive with water, sulphuric acid, or powerful oxidizing agents.
Carbon DioxideCompressed gas; non-flammable.
Phosphoric AnhydrideFlammable material; ignites spontaneously in air and explodes on contact with oxidizing materials; very toxic.
Sulphur DioxideCompressed gas; corrosive and poisonous.
Sulphur TrioxideCorrosive liquid. See Sulphuric Acid.
AnilineFlammable liquid subject to spontaneous heating; fumes are toxic.
Rust-preventing or Rust-removing compoundsCorrosive liquids.
Arsenical compoundsPoisons.
ArsineExtremely poisonous gas.
Lead AzideExplosive.
Sodium AzideFlammable material; may decompose with explosive violence when exposed to heat or shock; very toxic.
BariumFlammable material; liberates large quantities of hydrogen in presence of water. See Alkali metals.
BenzoatesCombustible solids.
BenzonitrileSee Nitriles.
Sugar Beet, driedFlammable material susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Sulphur DichlorideCorrosive liquid.
Titanium DichlorideHighly flammable material; liberates hydrogen chloride on exposure to moist air.
Ammonium DichromateFlammable material; may react explosively with certain organic compounds.
Lead DioxidePowerful oxidizing agent.
BitumenCombustible solid.
WoodwoolCombustible solid; easily ignited and burns fiercely.
BromatesPowerful oxidizing agents.
BromineVery corrosive liquid; may produce fire upon contact with organic matter; fumes are toxic.
Acetyl BromideFuming corrosive liquid.
Ethyl BromideAnesthetic and refrigerant; flammable and toxic.
Ethylene Bromide (or Dibromide)Quite volatile and highly toxic; non-flammable.
Carbonyl BromideVolatile liquid; vapors are classified with poisonous gases.
Methyl BromideCompressed gas; non-flammable but toxic; fumigant.
Bromides, organicMost are flammable materials; yield toxic gases when subjected to heat or flame.
ButadieneFlammable gas; may form explosive peroxides on exposure to air.
ButaneLiquefied petroleum gas.
CalciumFlammable material; reacts with moisture and acids to liberate large quantities of hydrogen.
CamphorFlammable material; fumes are toxic; gives off flammable vapors when heated.
Rubber Scrap or BuffingsCombustible solid.
Rubber reclaimedCombustible solid.
Aluminum CarbideFlammable material; decomposes on contact with water or moisture to evolve methane.
Calcium CarbideFlammable material; reacts with moisture to liberate acetylene.
CelluloidFlammable solid. See Nitrocellulose.
CesiumSee Alkali metals.
KetenePoisonous gas.
Charcoal (activated carbon)Freshly calcined material ignites spontaneously when exposed to air or when wet.
Lime, unslakedSee Calcium Oxide.
Rags, oilyFlammable materials susceptible to spontaneous heating.
ChloratesPowerful oxidizing agents; liberates oxygen explosively under influence of friction, shock, or heat.
Barium ChloratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Calcium ChloratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Copper ChloratePowerful oxidizing agent. See Chlorates.
Magnesium ChloratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Potassium ChloratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Sodium ChloratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Strontium ChloratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Zinc ChloratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Mercurous ChloratePowerful oxidizing agent.
ChlorineCompressed gas; toxic; supports combustion.
ChloritesPowerful oxidizing agent.
Ethyl ChlorocarbonateCorrosive liquid.
ChloroformAnesthetic; non-flammable but toxic.
Methyl ChloroformateCorrosive liquid.
ChloropicrinPoisonous gas.
Methyl ChlorosulphonateCorrosive liquid.
ChlorotrifluoromethaneNonflammable refrigerant; non-toxic and non-corrosive.
Acetyl ChlorideFuming corrosive liquid.
Nitrogen ChlorideFlammable material; very explosive and sensitive to shock and vibration; decomposes explosively if temperature is raised above 60°C; fumes are toxic.
Ethyl ChlorideAnesthetic and refrigerant gas; flammable and toxic.
Iodine MonochlorideCorrosive liquid.
Benzoyl ChlorideCorrosive liquid; fumes are very irritating.
Benzyl ChlorideCorrosive liquid.
Carbonyl Chloride (Phosgene)Extremely poisonous gas.
Chlorinated LimeOxidizing agent; yields chlorine gas on contact with acids or moisture.
Chloroacetyl ChlorideCorrosive liquid; fumes are toxic.
Methyl ChlorideCompressed gas; flammable; refrigerant; decomposed by flame to yield hydrogen chloride and phosgene, a poisonous gas. See Chlorides, organic.
Methylene ChlorideCompressed gas or highly volatile liquid; non-flammable.
Pyrosulphuryl ChlorideCorrosive liquid; decomposes violently with water into sulphuric acid and hydrochloric acid.
Silicon ChlorideCorrosive liquid; evolves hydrogen chloride on exposure to moist air.
Sulphur ChlorideCorrosive liquid; flammable.
Sulphuryl ChlorideCorrosive liquid when in solution; decomposed by water to sulphuric and hydrochloric acids.
Thionyl ChlorideCorrosive liquid; decomposes into hydrogen chloride and sulphur dioxide on exposure to moist air.
Thiophosphoryl ChlorideCorrosive liquid.
Chlorides, organicMost are flammable and yield toxic fumes on exposure to heat or flame.
Stannic ChlorideReacts with moist air to liberate hydrogen chloride; corrosive liquid when in solution.
CollodionHighly flammable liquid. See Nitrocellulose.
CresolsCombustible materials; fumes are toxic.
Methyl CyanoformateDecomposed by alkalies or water to yield formic acid and methyl cyanide.
CyanogenPoisonous gas.
Cyano or Cyanogen compoundsToxic materials.
CyanidesExtremely poisonous; reacts with acids and sometimes with moisture to give off hydrocyanic acid, a poisonous gas.
Carbonyl CyanideUnstable in the presence of water; fumes are toxic. See Cyanides.
Sodium CyanideCorrosive and extremely poisonous. See Cyanides.
CyclohexanolFlammable liquid; fumes are toxic.
CyclohexanoneFlammable liquid; fumes are toxic.
CycloniteHighly explosive.
CyclopropaneAnesthetic; highly flammable gas.
DichlorethyleneRefrigerant gas; flammable; can form violently explosive peroxides in presence of air.
Hydrogen PeroxidePowerful oxidizing agent; corrosive liquid; concentrated solutions may react explosively with combustible materials.
Aqua RegiaCorrosive liquid; attacks metals with evolution of hydrogen.
EthaneCompressed gas; highly flammable; refrigerant.
EthersSome are quite volatile and highly flammable; refrigerant; fumes are toxic; may form explosive peroxides during storage.
Ethyl EtherQuite volatile and highly flammable liquid; tends to form explosive peroxides during storage.
Vinyl EtherQuite volatile and highly flammable liquid; anesthetic.
EthyleneAnesthetic gas; highly flammable.
Alfalfa MealFlammable material highly susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Corn Meal FeedsUsually contain an appreciable quantity of oil and may ignite spontaneously.
Tung Nut MealsFlammable material susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Fish MealFlammable material; may self-heat if overdried or packaged at a temperature above 38°C
Feeds, variousFlammable materials; may self-heat and ignite spontaneously if not cooled properly before storage.
Iron spongeFlammable material.
Iron PentacarbonylFlammable material; decomposes on exposure to air with the possibility of spontaneous ignition; must be stored under water or under an atmosphere of nitrogen.
Fibres, vegetableFlammable solids; particularly hazardous when containing animal or vegetable oil.
FluorineCompressed gas; toxic; supports combustion.
Methyl FluoroformateCorrosive liquid.
Methyl FluorosulphonateCorrosive liquid.
Carbonyl FluorideUnstable in the presence of water; fumes are toxic.
Fluorides, inorganicNoncombustible but poisonous.
Formaldehyde, solutionHighly flammable liquid; fumes are very toxic; reaction with oxidizing materials yields formaldehyde gas and may produce sufficient heat to ignite nearby combustible materials.
FormalinSee Formaldehyde, solution.
Methyl FormateFlammable liquid; fumes are toxic; fumigant.
FreonCompressed gas; non-flammable. See Fluorocarbons.
FulminatesExplosives.
FumigantsToxic materials; some may also be flammable substances.
Coal TarCombustible liquid or semi-solid.
SeedsOily seeds are susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Hexamethylenediamine, solutionCorrosive liquid.
Oiled clothing, fabrics, rags or silkFlammable materials subject to spontaneous heating.
Tung Oil (China Wood Oil)Flammable material highly susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Peanut OilFlammable material susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Olive OilFlammable material; may be subject to spontaneous heating.
Bone OilFlammable material; subject to spontaneous heating.
Whale OilFlammable material highly susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Coconut Oil, refinedFlammable material; may be subject to spontaneous heating.
Cottonseed OilFlammable material; highly susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Creosote OilCombustible liquid; fumes are toxic.
Cod Liver OilFlammable material; highly susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Pine Tar OilFlammable material susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Lubricating OilCombustible liquid; may be subject to spontaneous heating.
Lard OilFlammable material highly susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Linseed OilFlammable material highly susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Corn Oil (Maize Oil)Flammable material; susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Menhaden OilFlammable material highly susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Mustard OilFlammable material highly susceptible to spontaneous heating,
Palm OilFlammable material susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Palm Kernel OilFlammable material susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Paraffin OilsCombustible liquids.
Perilla OilFlammable material highly susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Neatsfoot OilFlammable material; may be subject to spontaneous heating.
Pine OilFlammable material susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Castor OilFlammable material; may be subject to spontaneous heating.
Soya Bean OilFlammable material highly susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Sperm OilFlammable material susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Tallow OilFlammable material susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Mineral OilSee Lubricating Oil.
Hydrazine HydrateFlammable and corrosive liquid; vapour is explosive and highly toxic.
HydrazineFlammable and corrosive liquid; unstable; vapour is explosive and highly toxic.
HydrocarbonsFlammable liquids or combustible solids.
Chlorinated HydrocarbonsMost evolve toxic fumes, particularly when exposed to heat or flame.
FluorocarbonsGenerally non-flammable and non-toxic; may however decompose at high temperatures to yield toxic products.
HydrogenCompressed gas; flammable.
Sodium HydrosulphiteFlammable material susceptible to spontaneous heating in presence of moisture.
Hexafluorophosphoric AcidCorrosive liquid.
Potassium HydroxideGenerates heat on contact with water; corrosive liquid when in solution.
Rubidium HydroxideCorrosive liquid when in solution.
Sodium HydroxideGenerates heat on contact with water; corrosive liquid when in solution.
HydroxylamineFlammable material; may decompose explosively when heated to a temperature of 265°F.
HydridesFlammable materials; most react with moisture to release hydrogen.
Calcium HydrideFlammable material; decomposes in moist air to liberate hydrogen.
Lithium HydrideFlammable material. See Hydrides.
Lithium Aluminum HydrideFlammable material; liberates hydrogen on exposure to moist air. See Hydrides.
Sodium HydrideFlammable material. See Hydrides.
Lithium HypochloritePowerful oxidizing agent.
HypophosphitesFlammable materials; decompose when heated to yield phosphine; form powerful explosives with oxidizing materials.
Sodium HypophosphiteFlammable material. See Hypophosphites.
InsecticidesToxic materials; generally dissolved in a flammable liquid.
IodatesPowerful oxidizing agents.
Acetyl IoditeFuming corrosive liquid.
Methyl IodideFlammable liquid; fumes are toxic.
IsobutaneCompressed gas; highly flammable; refrigerant.
JuteCombustible fibre.
KapokCombustible fibre.
Wool wastesFlammable materials which contain oil; susceptible to spontaneous heating and possible ignition particularly when wet.
LanolinFlammable material; may be subject to spontaneous heating.
LithargeSee Lead compounds.
LithiumFlammable material; reacts vigorously with acids or water to liberate hydrogen gas. See Alkali metals.
MagnesiumHighly flammable material; can cause explosion when in a finely divided state.
Mixed AcidMixture of sulphuric and nitric acids; highly corrosive liquid; fumes are very toxic.
Mercury CompoundsToxic materials.
Methyl MethacrylateFlammable liquid; fumes are toxic.
Carbon MonoxidePoisonous gas.
Nickel CarbonylFlammable material; very toxic; readily decomposed by heat into metallic nickel and carbon monoxide.
Nitraniline or NitroanilineHighly toxic material; in the presence of moisture it can react with organic materials and cause spontaneous ignition.
Ammonium NitratePowerful oxidizing agent and explosive material; often explodes under apparently mysterious circumstances.
Ceric Ammonium NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Nickel Ammonium NitratePowerful oxidizing agent; may decompose with violence.
Potassium Ammonium NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Zinc Ammonium NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Silver NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Ethyl NitrateFlammable liquid.
Uranium NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Barium NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Calcium NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Cellulose NitrateSee Nitrocellulose.
Cobaltous NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Copper NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Didymium NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Guanidine NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Lithium NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Magnesium NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Methyl NitrateExplosive.
Nickel NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Lead NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Potassium NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Sodium NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Strontium NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Thorium NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Zinc NitratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Nitrates, inorganicPowerful oxidizing agents; yield oxygen on exposure to heat; can cause fires and explosion upon contact with readily oxidizable materials.
Mercuric NitrateOxidizing agent.
NitrilesOrganic cyanides. See Cyanides.
Acrilic NitrileSee Acrylonitrile.
Ethyl NitriteFlammable liquid.
Potassium NitritePowerful oxidizing agent.
Sodium NitritePowerful oxidizing agent.
Nitrites, inorganicPowerful oxidizing agents.
NitrobenzeneFlammable material; may be subject to spontaneous heating; fumes are very toxic.
NitrobenzolSee Nitrobenzene.
NitrocelluloseHighly flammable material; can be explosive if dry.
NitroglycerinExplosive.
NitroguanidineExplosive.
NitromanniteExplosive.
NitrotrichloromethaneSee Chloropicrin.
NitroureaExplosive.
LampblackFlammable material subject to spontaneous ignition when in a damp condition.
OleumCorrosive liquid; fumes are quite toxic. See Sulphuric Acid.
Phosphorus OxychlorideCorrosive liquid; reacts violently with water; fumes are toxic.
Ethylene OxideCompressed gas; highly flammable; fumigant.
OxygenCompressed gas; non-flammable; supports combustion.
Paraffin WaxCombustible solid.
ParaformaldehydeFlammable material; evolves formaldehyde gas upon heating.
Paint ScrapingsFlammable material susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Paint containing drying oilsFlammable material highly susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Antimony PentachlorideCorrosive liquid; gives off hydrogen chloride in presence of moist air.
Phosphorus PentachlorideFlammable material; liberates phosphoric acid and hydrogen chloride on contact with moisture; corrosive.
Antimony PentasulphideCombustible solid readily ignitable by a small flame; yields hydrogen sulphide on contact with mineral acids.
Phosphorus PentasulphideFlammable material; can be ignited by friction and burns in air to form phosphoric anhydride and sulphur dioxide.
PerboratesWeak oxidizing agents.
Magnesium PerboratePowerful oxidizing agent.
PerchloratesPowerful oxidizing agents; unstable materials.
Ammonium PerchloratePowerful oxidizing agent; extremely unstable; heat or shock can cause it to decompose with explosive violence.
Barium PerchloratePowerful oxidizing agent; may explode on contact with combustible materials.
Magnesium PerchloratePowerful oxidizing agent.
Potassium PerchloratePowerful oxidizing agent; decomposed by concussion, organic matter or other oxidizable materials.
Sodium PerchloratePowerful oxidizing agent; decomposed by concussion, organic matter or other oxidizable materials.
Mercuric PerchloratePowerful oxidizing agent.
PermanganatesPowerful oxidizing agent.
Succinic Acid PeroxidePowerful oxidizing agent. See Peroxides, organic.
Nitrogen DioxidePoisonous gas; corrosive; supports combustion.
Hydrogen PeroxidePowerful oxidizing agent; corrosive liquid; concentrated solutions may react explosively with combustible materials.
Barium PeroxidePowerful oxidizing agent.
Benzoyl PeroxidePowerful oxidizing agent.
Lauroyl PeroxidePowerful oxidizing agent.
Lithium PeroxidePowerful oxidizing agent.
Magnesium PeroxidePowerful oxidizing agent.
Nickel PeroxidePowerful oxidizing agent.
Potassium PeroxidePowerful oxidizing agent. See Peroxides, inorganic.
Sodium PeroxidePowerful oxidizing agent; reacts violently with water to liberate free oxygen.
Strontium PeroxidePowerful oxidizing agent.
Zinc PeroxidePowerful oxidizing agent.
Peroxides, inorganicPowerful oxidizing agents; decompose easily in presence of heat or moisture to liberate free oxygen.
Peroxides, organicFlammable materials and powerful oxidizing agents.
PersulphatesPowerful oxidizing agents.
Ammonium PersulphatePowerful oxidizing agent sensitive to heat and shock.
Potassium PersulphatePowerful oxidizing agent.
PhenolFumes are flammable, corrosive and highly toxic.
PhosgenePoisonous gas.
PhosphinePoisonous gas; highly flammable.
Phosphorus, white or yellowFlammable material; ignites spontaneously in air and explodes on contact with oxidizing materials; very toxic.
PhosphidesFlammable materials; yield phosphine on contact with moisture.
Calcium PhosphideFlammable material; reacts with water to liberate phosphine, a flammable and poisonous gas.
PicratesExplosives.
Ammonium PicrateExplosive.
Lead CompoundsToxic materials.
Tetraethyl LeadFlammable liquid; vapour is highly toxic.
Fish ScrapFlammable material; may self-heat if overdried.
Potassium, metallicSee Alkali metals.
Bleaching powderSee Chlorinated Lime.
Blasting PowdersSlow-acting explosives.
Metal PowdersFlammable materials when in a finely divided form; may be subject to spontaneous heating; dust may constitute an explosion hazard.
PropaneLiquified petroleum gas; highly flammable; refrigerant.
Nitrous OxideCompressed gas; non-flammable; supports combustion; weak anesthetic.
PyroxylinSee Nitrocellulose.
ResinatesFlammable materials; some are subject to spontaneous heating when moist.
RubidiumSee Alkali metals.
Bags and sacks (empty)Combustible solids; may be liable to spontaneous combustion if previously used as containers for nitrates, sugar or oily materials.
SawdustCombustible solid; may be subject to spontaneous heating when charred or partially burned.
Selenium CompoundsHighly toxic materials.
Phosphorus SesquisulphideFlammable solid.
Lithium SiliconFlammable material; liberates hydrogen on exposure to moist air.
SisalCombustible fibre.
Sodium, metallicSee Alkali metals.
SulphurCombustible solid; dust may form explosive mixtures with air.
StrontiumFlammable material; liberates hydrogen on contact with moisture.
TallowFlammable material susceptible to spontaneous heating.
Dimethyl SulphateCorrosive liquid; fumes are very toxic.
Titanous sulphate, solutionCorrosive liquid.
SulphidesFlammable materials; evolve hydrogen sulphide on exposure to acid fumes; susceptible to spontaneous heating if stored in bulk in a moist condition.
Potassium SulphideFlammable material; liberates hydrogen sulphide on contact with mineral acids.
Sodium SulphideFlammable material; liberates hydrogen sulphide on contact with mineral acids.
Titanium TetrachlorideCorrosive liquid; liberates hydrogen chloride on exposure to moist air.



Appendix 5


Consumption of drinking water

DestinationCharacteristicConsumption litre/dUnits
Commercial laundromats1 500washing machine
200wash
Office60worker
Construction campTemporary200person
Shopping centerWithout restaurant or laundry4square feet
Store1 500washroom
Manufacturer1Without shower60worker
With shower130worker
Plant or factoryWithout shower60worker
With shower130worker
Service station40self-service
4 0001st service space
2 000extra spaces
N.B.1 This consumption does not take into account, industrial processed used.



Appendix 6


Number of obligatory sanitary fixtures

DestinationToilet facilities Urinals Wash basins FountainsTubs or showersOther fixtures
MWMW
Stores (b)
  customers1/3001/300See (a)1/3001/3001/75
 workers (a)
Factories, manufacturers, warehouses, foundries shops, food products, etc.
  1 to 10 (c) workers11
  11 to 252211/101/10See (d)
  26 to 30331
  31 to 50332on per 75 workers
  51 to 75442
  76 to 80552
  81 to 100553
  101 to 150suppl.suppl.31/751/75
  151 to 2401/451/454
suppl.1/90
Service stations, gasoline stations(e)(e)(e)(e)(e)(e)
Buildings under construction
  1 to 210 workers1/30See (f)
  211 and moreSee (g)
Temporary cabins, shelters,
and buildings
  See (h)11
N.B.
(a) Sanitary installations for workers shall be the same as those required for office buildings.
(b) A group of stores may use a common toilet provided it is accessible by an interior passageway.
(c) One toilet is suitable for 10 workers either of one or the other sex.
(d) It is necessary to have at least one shower per 15 workers when they are exposed to excessive heat or to corrosive, poisonous, irritant, or infectious products that risk coming into contact with the skin.
(e) Separate rooms for each sex should be arranged with separate access.
(f) Wash basins must be installed if workers are required to handle corrosive, poisonous or irritant substances.
(g) If there are more than 210 workers, the inspector shall decide upon the sanitary installations.
(h) A toilet and a wash basin shall be installed unless there are toilet facilities within a maximum radius of 30.5 metres and written authorization has been given for use of these facilities.
(i) For men, half of the regulation toilet facilities may be replaced by urinals.



Appendix 7


Labor and Manpower Department


Labour Inspection Service


PERMIT APPLICATION


Employment of women at night
Click here for graphical image.

Appendix 8


Labor and Manpower Department


PERMIT


Employment of women at night


Industrial and Commercial Establishments Act (R.S.Q., 1964 ch. 150)


Provided that the following conditions are adhered to:
1. Work shall commence between 11 and 12 o’clock midnight.
2. The work period must not exceed 8 hours.
3. 30 minutes are allowed for lunch at/or about the middle of the work period.
4. 2 additional rest intervals of 10 minutes each must be allowed.
5. No person under 18 years of age is employed on the night shift.
6. The remuneration rates are not less than those for the employees of the other 2 shifts.
7. The same premium for night employment is paid for women as for other persons.
8. A safe and convenient means of transport is provided for returning home in case of emergency or before 7:00 o’clock in the morning.
9. At least one female supervisor is in attendance to give First Aid Service during the work period.
10. There shall be at least 2 women per work room or shop.
11. Convenient lunch room facilities are provided for the meal period.
12. This permit is posted in a conspicuous place at the worker’s main entrance.
13. This permit is valid for the period indicated below only.
14. This permit may be cancelled without notice in case of violation of one of the conditions under which it has been issued.
Click here for graphical image.